This is Public Health

Health IT

Men can make their health a priority. Take daily steps to be healthier and stronger. This week is National Men’s Health Week, June 9-15, 2014. There are many easy things you can do every day to improve your health and stay healthy, including:

  • Getting enough sleep
  • Quitting tobacco
  • Moving more
  • Eating healthier
  • Taming stress
  • Seeing your doctor

Click here to learn more about Men’s Health Week.

Flip Flops

After months of patiently waiting, it’s finally here: the sizzling hot days of summer. With summer serving as the unofficial start to the celebrated season of sun, you want to make sure it’s as healthy and safe for you and your family as possible.

From traffic safety to diet reminders, here are tips from WebMD that will have you starting your summer off on the right flip-flop.

Click here to learn more.

beach-ball

Having fun while you swim this summer means knowing how to prevent recreational water illnesses (RWIs) and injuries. Learn how to stay healthy and safe while enjoying the water!

Swimming is one of the most popular sports activities in the United States. Although swimming is a physical activity that offers many health benefits, pools and other recreational water venues are also places where germs can be spread and injuries can happen.

May 19–25, 2014, the week before Memorial Day, marks the tenth annual Recreational Water Illness and Injury (RWII) Prevention Week.

Click here to learn more.

medical-check-up

National Women’s Health Week is an observance led by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health. The goal is to empower women to make their health a priority. National Women’s Health Week also serves as a time to help women understand what it means to be well.

Click here for tips on what it means to be a well woman.

 

diversewomen

We encourage moms to make their health a priority and take simple steps to live a safer and healthier life. While being a mother means caring for others, here are a few things moms can do to take care of themselves. Moms of every age can take steps to live a safer and healthier life.

Click here to read more.

nurse-and-child

A new study reveals that children who spend two hours or more in front of a screen (TV, computer, videogames etc.) have over 2.5 fold increase in their odds of having high blood pressure (BP). These odds are increased further by overweight and obesity. The study also showed that children with a low level of fitness had 3.4 times higher odds of high BP than those with a high level of fitness.

Click here to read the full story.

Get Out Ahead

April 9th, 2014

Health IT

Prevention is now a nationwide priority, and as the public health system evolves, there are more options than ever when it comes to preventive health measures.  Public health and clinical health professionals must work collaboratively to help individuals identify and pursue the best preventative health options.

Read more about today’s National Public Health Week theme: Get Out Ahead.

Be Healthy from the Start

April 7th, 2014

High Chair

April 7-11 is National Public Health Week, and today’s theme is “Be Healthy from the Start.” Public health starts at home. From family nutrition and maternal health to safety precautions and disaster preparedness, the first step the community takes toward public health are in the comfort of their own home. Empower your community to take action at home through better meal planning, conducting safety upgrades and preparing for emergencies.

Click here to read tips for preparing your family for a healthy future.

walking-photo1

People turning 50 may want to consider tweaking their exercise routines because as they age stiffer joints, slower recovery from injury and the loss of lean body mass are among the perils facing the youngest baby boomers, fitness experts say.

Studies have shown that even a 90-year-old can build muscle, so the half-century mark is a good time to retire joint-stressing high jumps and to start lifting dumbbells to build strength.

Click here to read the full article.

bike-lane

Don’t forget to look both ways before crossing the street — especially if you’re walking the streets in Louisiana. According to a recent study, the Pelican State has the fifth highest pedestrian death rate in the country.

The report, prepared by the Center for Planning Excellence and the Louisiana Public Health Institute, evaluated 10 years of federal fatality data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report demonstrates a need for more state and city planners to incorporate pedestrian and cyclist safety into traffic plans, according to Rachel DiResto, CPEX executive vice president.

Read the full story from The Advocate and review the documents here.